Number of forcibly displaced rises to 43.3 million last year, the highest level since mid-1990s‏

16.06.2010 10:06

BERLIN, Germany, June 15 (UNHCR) – Annual figures released Tuesday by the UN refugee agency show that some 43.3 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide at the end of 2009, the highest number of people uprooted by conflict and persecution since the mid-1990s.

At the same time, according to the 2009 Global Trends report, the number of refugees voluntarily returning to their home countries has fallen to its lowest level in 20 years. UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres, commenting on the figures during an address in Berlin on Tuesday, said "last year was not a good year for voluntary repatriation."

The report also indicated that overall refugee numbers remained relatively stable at 15.2 million, two thirds of whom come under UNHCR's mandate while the other third fall under the responsibility of the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East. More than half of the refugees under UNHCR's care, or 5.5 million people, are in protracted situations.

Commenting on the voluntary repatriation figures – 251,000 last year against a norm over the past decade of around 1 million people per year – Guterres noted that "major conflicts such as those in Afghanistan, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo show no signs of being resolved. Conflicts that had appeared to be ending or were on the way to being resolved, such as in southern Sudan or in Iraq, are stagnating."

The High Commissioner, addressing the annual Berlin Symposium for Refugee Protection on the first day of his second five-year mandate, added that "already a majority of the world's refugees have been living as refugees for five years or more. Inevitably, that proportion will grow – if fewer refugees are able to go home."

The 2009 Global Trends report said the number of people uprooted by conflict within their own country grew by four per cent to 27.1 million at the end of 2009. Persistent conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan and Somalia mainly accounted for the increase in the overall figure.

The annual survey also noted that more and more refugees are living in cities, primarily in the developing world, contrary to the notion that refugees are inundating industrialized nations.

The number of new individual asylum claims worldwide grew to nearly 1 million, with South Africa receiving more than 222,000 new claims last year, making it the single largest asylum destination in the world.

The annual Global Trends report, which reviews statistical trends and patterns of conflict-related displacements, also covers stateless people. The number of people known to be stateless at the end of 2009 was 6.6 million though unofficial estimates range as high as 12 million.

UNHCR protects, assists and seeks solutions for refugees. The persistence of conflict makes voluntary return to countries of origin, the solution preferred by host countries and refugees alike, more difficult.

With resettlement – through which refugees hosted in one asylum state, usually in the developing world, are permanently relocated to another state, usually in the developed world – UNHCR submitted a record 128,000 individuals for resettlement in third countries, the highest level in 16 years.

At the end of 2009, 112,400 refugees were admitted for resettlement by 19 countries, including the United States (79,900), Canada (12,500) and Australia (11,100). The main refugee groups resettled in 2009 were from Myanmar (24,800), Iraq (23,000), Bhutan (17,500) and Somalia (5,500).

Meanwhile, High Commissioner Guterres outlined some of the challenges and priorities during his second term, which will also coincide with UNHCR's 60th anniversary in December. He said the main challenges were the "growing resilience of crises," the shrinking humanitarian space in which refugees can find shelter and humanitarian agencies can work, and the erosion of asylum space.

He listed two priorities to respond to the challenges. "First, preparing our capacity to meet the needs of the people we care for. Particular attention is required to address gaps that currently exist in the response to refugees in mixed migratory flow and protection situations, and to IDPs living outside camps, especially in urban areas," Guterres said.

"Second, we will continue to enhance our emergency response capability in a livelihoods-focused and environmentally sensitive way, taking due account of the needs of host families, communities and states," he added.

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"Commitment is what transforms a promise into reality. It is the words that speak boldly of your intentions and the actions which speak louder than words. It is making the time when there is none. It is coming through time after time, year after year. Commitment is the stuff character is made of, the power to change the face of things. It is the triumph of integrity over skepticism".

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HOST AN EVENT ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Helping victims of human trafficking is as simple as talking to a friend. Host an event and invite the community to discuss the exploitation of human beings. At this campaign, we are eager to spread the word and we'd like to talk at any community event about human trafficking and victim identification.

For more information, contact us at debbie.marulanda@gmail.com

 

Trafficking in Persons Report 2016

 

Date: 06/30/2016 Description: Trafficking in Persons Report 2016. - State Dept Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PDF Format

-Trafficking in Persons Report 2016 -- Complete Report (PDF)
-Introductory Material (PDF)
-Country Narratives: A-C (PDF)
-Country Narratives: D-I (PDF)
-Country Narratives: J-M (PDF)
-Country Narratives: N-S (PDF)
-Country Narratives: T-Z and Special Case (PDF)
-Relevant International Conventions/Closing Material (PDF)

 

GET INVOLVED!

 

These are some of the things you can do to help fight human trafficking:

Be informed! Educate yourself about human trafficking by reading about it. Follow events in the news. Keep your eyes open - human trafficking is happening all around us.

Raise awareness! Talk to friends, family and colleagues. You could even start talking to your local politicians and authorities.

Get involved! Participate in an anti-trafficking movement in your area and get involved in its activities and campaigns (e.g. hold events, distribute posters, leaflets etc.) in your neighborhood and in schools.

Encourage businesses! Be a responsible consumer! Inform yourself on the labour policies of companies to ensure their products are free from slave labour and other forms of exploitation. If possible, buy fair trade products.

Seek support! If you suspect that someone has been trafficked report it to the institutions or assistance facilities dealing with human trafficking in your area.

 

Office to Monitor and

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in Persons

 

"It ought to concern every person, because it is a debasement of our common humanity. It ought to concern every community, because it tears at our social fabric. It ought to concern every business, because it distorts markets. It ought to concern every nation, because it endangers public health and fuels violence and organized crime. I’m talking about the injustice, the outrage, of human trafficking, which must be called by its true name -- modern slavery."

– President Barack OBAMA

http://www.state.gov/j/tip/index.htm

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