Parents that Pimp their own kids...

13.06.2011 11:30

May 20, 2011

Parents indicted for human trafficking

RICHMOND — Two Madison County parents were indicted Wednesday on human trafficking charges and could spend up to 20 years in prison for allegedly selling the sexual favors of their teenage daughters.

Kathy and Anthony Wayne Hart were indicted for “... arranging for their 13- and 14-year-old daughters to provide companionship and affection to male individuals in exchange for money and goods ...,” the indictment reads.

The incidents reportedly took place between Oct. 10, 2009, and Feb. 24, 2011.

Human trafficking is a Class B felony, punishable by a maximum of 20 years in prison.

Madison County authorities began investigating the Harts on Dec. 11 when a Foley Middle School teacher called Richmond Police to report two students from her school dressed “inappropriately” as they stood in front of the cinema at Richmond Centre.

The teacher also told police she heard a man ask the girls’ father “how much he wanted for both of them.”

The girls were dressed in “lacy, hot-pink negligee-like tops, tight jeans and boots,” according to Richmond Police Officer Nicholas Duvall who came to investigate, Boyle said. The temperature was in the 30s.

Duvall interviewed both girls, who told him their mother “made them go out with guys for money, food and clothing.” Their mother would yell at them if they did not hold hands and let themselves be touched and kissed, Boyle said, relaying Duvall’s report. The girls were never hit by their parents, however, she said they told the Richmond officer.

Berea Police were called when the teacher reported that the girls failed to show up for school the following Monday. Boyle said she was unable to locate the family until the girls were enrolled at a middle school in a nearby county after the first of the year.

Boyle and an investigator from the state Department of Children and Family Services then went to the school and interviewed the girls. Both said their mother would approach men at Walmart or Kroger and asked if they wanted to spend time with her girls.

The mother would encourage them to let the men touch and kiss them because they would receive money and clothing in exchange, Boyle said the girls told her.

The men also would take photos of them “with their clothes partially off,” Boyle testified.

After hearing that, Boyle said she obtained consent from the parents to enter the motel where the family had been staying and obtained their digital camera and reviewed its contents.

The older girl, age 14, said one of the men who came to their home sexually assaulted her as her mother watched, Boyle said. The younger girl then attempted to come to her sister’s aid.

Both girls are living in foster care and are in counseling, Boyle said.

The two remained in the Madison County Detention Center Thursday without bond.

Anthony Hart already has served two years in a Boyle County prison four years ago for attempting to sell a child for adoption.

Anthony and Kathy Hart have had brushes with the law in up to five Kentucky counties going back at least 10 years, according to documents attached to their arrest citations.

In late 2002, both were indicted by a Boyle County grand jury on the child-selling charge, but the case against Kathy Hart was dismissed in 2004.

Another man indicted for having contact with girls

The grand jury also found evidence to indict Alexander Gomez-Lopez, 23, for first-degree sexual abuse, a Class D felony, and attempted second-degree rape, Class A misdemeanor.

A picture of Gomez-Lopez was found on the Hart’s confiscated digital camera.

He was arrested by Berea police after the 13- and 14-year-old girls identified him as one of several men their parents allowed to have sexual contact with them.

One photo shows Gomez-Lopez with the two girls, which they said was taken by their mother, Boyle testified.

His cell phone was seized when he was arrested, the detective said, and it is being analyzed by the Kentucky State Police laboratory.

Gomez-Lopez also attempted to rape one of them while their mother was close enough to hear, both girls claimed when they were interviewed separately by Boyle and an employee of the state Department of Children and Families, the detective said.

He also is wanted by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency and is being held at the Madison County Detention Center without bond. If convicted, Gomez-Lopez could serve up to five years in prison.

An indictment is a formal statement of charges and does not imply guilt.

Register Senior News Writer Bill Robinson contributed to this story.

Ronica Shannon can be reached at rshannon@

richmondregister.com or 624-6608.

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Debbie Marulanda

debbie.marulanda@gmail.com

1-908-410-9711

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"Commitment is what transforms a promise into reality. It is the words that speak boldly of your intentions and the actions which speak louder than words. It is making the time when there is none. It is coming through time after time, year after year. Commitment is the stuff character is made of, the power to change the face of things. It is the triumph of integrity over skepticism".

~Abraham Lincoln

 
 

 

 

 

HOST AN EVENT ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Helping victims of human trafficking is as simple as talking to a friend. Host an event and invite the community to discuss the exploitation of human beings. At this campaign, we are eager to spread the word and we'd like to talk at any community event about human trafficking and victim identification.

For more information, contact us at debbie.marulanda@gmail.com

 

Trafficking in Persons Report 2016

 

Date: 06/30/2016 Description: Trafficking in Persons Report 2016. - State Dept Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PDF Format

-Trafficking in Persons Report 2016 -- Complete Report (PDF)
-Introductory Material (PDF)
-Country Narratives: A-C (PDF)
-Country Narratives: D-I (PDF)
-Country Narratives: J-M (PDF)
-Country Narratives: N-S (PDF)
-Country Narratives: T-Z and Special Case (PDF)
-Relevant International Conventions/Closing Material (PDF)

 

GET INVOLVED!

 

These are some of the things you can do to help fight human trafficking:

Be informed! Educate yourself about human trafficking by reading about it. Follow events in the news. Keep your eyes open - human trafficking is happening all around us.

Raise awareness! Talk to friends, family and colleagues. You could even start talking to your local politicians and authorities.

Get involved! Participate in an anti-trafficking movement in your area and get involved in its activities and campaigns (e.g. hold events, distribute posters, leaflets etc.) in your neighborhood and in schools.

Encourage businesses! Be a responsible consumer! Inform yourself on the labour policies of companies to ensure their products are free from slave labour and other forms of exploitation. If possible, buy fair trade products.

Seek support! If you suspect that someone has been trafficked report it to the institutions or assistance facilities dealing with human trafficking in your area.

 

Office to Monitor and

Combat Trafficking

in Persons

 

"It ought to concern every person, because it is a debasement of our common humanity. It ought to concern every community, because it tears at our social fabric. It ought to concern every business, because it distorts markets. It ought to concern every nation, because it endangers public health and fuels violence and organized crime. I’m talking about the injustice, the outrage, of human trafficking, which must be called by its true name -- modern slavery."

– President Barack OBAMA

http://www.state.gov/j/tip/index.htm

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